College Transfer Tools

ACC Fall Transfer Fair 2017Over the last four years, I’ve had the privilege of working with countless ACC students interested in completing their associate degree and transferring to a university to obtain their bachelor’s degree. Our office, the Career & Transfer Center, is happy to sit down with students to plan out their ACC academic journey in order to ensure that they’re taking the right steps for maximum success. Along the way, I’ve introduced students to several cool transfer tools.

  1. Colorado Department of Higher Education’s Transfer Degrees. Our state has worked tirelessly to create agreements which allow you to graduate from a community college with a 60-credit Associate of Arts (AA) or Associate of Science (AS) degree, enroll with junior status at a university and complete the bachelor’s degree in no more than an additional 60 credits (for a total of 120 credits). Check them out!
  2. Transferology – Want to learn how your credits will transfer exactly to many of our state institutions? Check out this cool website which performs an unofficial degree audit for you – before you apply!
  3. Transfer Fairs! The best way to maximize your transfer is to connect with your university representatives early and often. Meet with over 40 of them at the fall transfer fair, Wednesday, September 26 from 10:30am – 1:30pm in the Summit Room at Littleton Campus.

Want to learn more about transfer? Come by our office on the 2nd floor of the main building on the ACC’s Littleton Campus, M2010. Or call us at 303-797-5805.

by Shari Culver, Director, ACC Career & Transfer Center

The time to plan your transfer is NOW!

Fall Transfer Fair 2017 bannerSo you think you might transfer? I talk to students all the time who say they’re interested in transferring, but they don’t want to start planning. Not yet. Not now. They don’t have time to think about it now, or plan for it now, and decide on it now. But…what if you don’t have time not to plan now?! Students who plan their transfer from the beginning are more likely to experience a smooth, seamless transfer. Ask yourself the questions below to get yourself off to a great start here at ACC and beyond.

Questions to Ask Yourself

  • What is your career path? Decide whether you’d like to pursue a Liberal Arts & Sciences degree (such as English, Biology, or Psychology) versus an engineering, nursing, business, music or computer science degree. The earlier you decide your path, the more time and money you can save!
  • What is your timeline? Determine when you will complete your Associate’s degree and when you plan to transfer to a 4-year institution.
  • How will your credits transfer? Meet with your 2-year advisor and an Admissions Counselor at the school of your choice to understand how your credits will transfer from the 2-year program to your school of choice.

Learn about the transfer process  – NOW!

Want to know more about how your credits will transfer? Want to learn about the admissions process and financial aid process at the 4-year university? Get answers to these questions at the upcoming FALL TRANSFER FAIR! Wednesday, October 4th from 10:30am – 1:30pm in the Summit Room of the Littleton campus.

by Shari Culver, ACC Career and Transfer Counselor

Tips and tricks for finding a job – for new graduates (or any job seeker!)

ACC 2016 Career Fair

ACC 2016 Career Fair

While today’s economy continues to show positive signs of growth, recent graduates and job seekers are learning that landing the ideal job can still be a time-consuming, lengthy process. As suggested in her “5 Big Reasons New Grads are Failing the Job Search,” Lea McLeod encourages job seekers to adjust their short term-mindsets and set realistic expectations with the understanding that a job search can take 22 weeks on average. Though the process may be a daunting one, here are some tips to keep in mind to maintain your motivation and encourage you from start to finish!

  • Be persistent! Create a job search strategic plan and work it every day. Think of your job search as a job. Remember all those hours you spent studying for exams and preparing presentations? Put equal energy into the time you spend job searching.
  • Set realistic expectations. As mentioned above, an average job search in the US can last over 4 months. Conduct market research and determine what’s happening in your industry. How long are job searches taking for different disciplines? With this in mind, set daily, weekly, and monthly goals for yourself in the process.
  • Develop a marketing mindset and identify your personal brand. Understanding who you are and who your potential customers (employers) are will help you be more efficient and effective in your job search. Get into self-assessment land and learn as much about yourself, your strengths, your desired workplace qualities and how you’ll add value. Based on your findings, develop clear messages about who you are and the value proposition you represent.
  • Get into the employer’s head. Use LinkedIn to research what employers want. Identify what jobs are posted, what problems are they trying to solve, what outcomes candidates are expected to achieve.
  • Work your network. Contact alumni in your field. Reach out to all your connections via LinkedIn or other Social Media outlets to remind them of your continued job search. Meet new industry connections by joining a professional groups in your area.

As McLeod offers in her article mentioned above, you want to stop asking “How can I find a job that pays a lot and that I love?” and start asking yourself “Who has problems that I love solving and how do I find them?” If you’re still coming up short-handed or feeling like you’re hitting the proverbial wall, use ACC’s Career & Transfer Center. Call 303-797-5705 to make an appointment with one of ACC’s career counselors to get additional advice and help with your resume, networking, and overall job search.

by Shari Culver, ACC Career and Transfer Counselor

What is Concurrent Enrollment

(And why should I participate?)

Move Mountains with the Concurrent Enrollment Program!

Move Mountains with the Concurrent Enrollment Program!

Have you heard your colleagues or friends talk about concurrent enrollment but wondered what it really is?  Concurrent Enrollment (CE) is a nationwide trend in higher education to offer high school students the option of participating in college-credit courses taught by college-approved high school teachers on their high school campuses. Sometimes called “dual credit” or “dual enrollment” or “college in the high school,” students enrolled in these classes earn credit towards both high school graduation and college completion.

Here at ACC, we offer students a couple different options.  One option is for students to take classes in their high school.  Check with your counselor for courses available at your school. Our Concurrent Enrollment Office works with over 30 high schools across 8 school districts enrolling over 2400 students per semester.  If a high school student discovers that the CE options on his/her high school campus don’t align with future career goals, a student may choose to take courses on our campus, with permission from their high school counselor, working with our Student Recruitment and Outreach Office.

So, why would a student want to participate in concurrent enrollment classes at their high school?  One great reason is cost: they’re free!  When taken at their high school, the cost of tuition for these classes is paid through the student’s home school district and the College Opportunity Fund (COF).  With the sky-rocketing costs of higher education and the continuing need for employees with degrees, students have the opportunity to lower their overall cost of college tuition, potentially reducing any future debt.

Another reason for students to take advantage of concurrent enrollment is the advantage of experience.  To enroll in a CE course, students apply for admission to the community college and begin their journey of higher education.  As CE students in the high school, they learn key skills that prepare them to transition smoothly into a post-secondary institution.

For students who’ve long known about (and perhaps dreaded) those AP or IB courses, a CE student has the advantage of earning the credit immediately on successful course completion with a “C” or higher with no exit exam or post-test required.  The credit appears on an ACC transcript as if the student had taken the course on our campus, and it can potentially apply directly towards a degree.  If a student takes a CE course designated as a “guaranteed transfer,” the course will transfer to any Colorado public institution.

If we want to create better futures for our secondary students with clearer pathways to post-secondary degrees and sustainable careers, perhaps we should look closer at encouraging them to consider their concurrent enrollment options!

To learn more about ACC’s Concurrent Enrollment Program, visit our website.

by Shari Culver, ACC Concurrent Enrollment Specialist