Student Access Services at ACC – What it is and how to utilize it

Student Access Services (SAS) at ACC is the office dedicated to providing services for students in need of accommodations so that they can be successful in their education. Our SAS team works with every department on campus to encourage and celebrate accessibility, accountability and self-advocacy.

Services offered by SAS include:

  • Classroom accommodations
  • Test accommodations
  • Specialized orientations for support services
  • Self-advocacy training and ADAAA/Section 504 information
  • Curriculum materials in alternate formats
  • Referrals for resources such as tutoring, career services or other support services as necessary

Accommodations that SAS provides include:

  • Alternative text format
    • Electronic: PDF or Kurzweil
    • Braille, DAISY
  • Interpreting / Captioning
    • Sign Language
    • Real Time Captioning
  • Ergonomic Furniture
    • Adjustable Table
    • Ergonomic Seating
    • Ergonomic Keyboard, Mouse
  • Note Taker

*You are encouraged to request these accommodations at least 3-4 weeks before your first day of class.

Are you eligible for services?

If you are a registered ACC student with a disability, you qualify for accommodations. This can be a permanent condition or temporary (like breaking your arm and needing help with notes).

Be sure to follow our checklist to make sure you are on track with the steps you need to become an ACC student. It is important to complete as many of these steps as possible prior to meeting with a SAS specialist.

You’ll need to take a few additional steps to set up your accommodations, remembering to begin this process at least 4 weeks before the beginning of classes, if possible.  If you can’t gather your documentation or complete your intake form ahead of time, please come in anyway.

  1. Schedule an appointment with a SAS specialist. You can make your appointment by stopping by room M2720 at the Littleton campus, calling 303.797.5730 or requesting an appointment online. It can take up to a week to set-up your appointment, so plan accordingly.
  2. Fill out an Intake Form (PDF or online) before your scheduled appointment. This will give us an idea of what types of accommodations you need and what services we can provide to make your time at ACC as successful as possible.
  3. Bring or send recent documentation of a disability to SAS prior to your intake appointment.
  4. Meet with your SAS specialist and obtain an Accommodation Letter.
  5. Meet with your instructors and give them a copy of your Accommodation Letter.

It is important that you request your accommodations before classes start. This will get you off to the best possible start and ensure your success in your classes. Setting up accommodations can take some time and you don’t want to get behind.

Leia requests Accommodations video

You also need to be sure to set up testing accommodations with your instructor and the ACC Testing Center at least 7 days ahead of each test. Our instructors and Testing Center staff want to work with you to give you the best environment for testing for you, but they need time to make the necessary testing arrangements.

Chewy at the Testing Center

A disability doesn’t need to keep you from achieving your goals. Let our SAS specialists help you create an atmosphere where it is easier for you to learn and complete your studies. Learn how to advocate for yourself and your needs so you can get the help you need to accomplish your goals and Move Mountains!

Our SAS specialists are here to help. Contact them today in M2720 at the Littleton campus, email sas@arapahoe.edu or call 303.797.5730 (voice/TTY).

Student Services at ACC that won’t cost you a thing!

ACC students in writing centerArapahoe Community College is the perfect place to begin – or continue – your journey towards Moving Mountains with your academic and career goals.

ACC offers an affordable education (lowest tuition among state-funded schools) with instructors who are experts in their field. Classes are available online and at our campuses in Littleton, Parker and Castle Rock. We’re close to home, and our small class sizes allow students to receive individual attention.

Our Career & Transfer Center provides guidance for students looking to continue their education beyond ACC. In fact, we offer guaranteed transfer programs to all four-year Colorado public institutions. Transfer fairs and employment expos, as well as job/career exploration events, are held during the fall and spring semesters. Peer tutoring services, as well as math and writing support centers, are offered at no cost to students. Academic Advising provides one-on-one assistance with course selection and the registration process as students develop their personalized plan for one of seven degree pathways.

Students can get involved with clubs and organizations as they acclimate to college life. Our honor societies and student government foster leadership skills and provide opportunities for scholarly growth. The Student Success Center facilitates a variety of tools and enrichment workshops to hone time-management and study skills.

ACC is committed to supporting veterans and military-connected students, and has been named as a Military-Friendly School. Student Access Services can assist with permanent or temporary accommodations, and on-campus counseling services are available through the Student Engagement Center. ACC also introduced the Elevate program in 2016, providing students with intellectual and developmental disabilities the opportunity to pursue higher education.

The Library & Learning Commons offers the optimal environment for individual research or group study sessions. Our Fitness Center is open Monday – Saturday, providing a welcoming facility complete with treadmills, spin bikes, free weights, locker rooms and contemporary recreational amenities. ACC also has a fully-accredited childcare center on site, providing students, employees and members of the community with a clean, healthy and nurturing environment for little ones throughout the fall, spring and summer semesters.

ACC is partnering with Colorado State University and the Douglas County School District on the new Castle Rock Collaboration Campus. Students can now complete their associate degree or certification in its entirety at the recently-renovated Parker Campus. Brand new, state-of-the-art science labs at the Littleton Campus will deliver the best in experiential and collaborative learning.

Our faculty and staff are dedicated to providing innovative and responsive educational and economic opportunities in an accessible, inclusive environment that promotes success for students, employees and members of the south metro Denver communities.

Whether you’re a prospective, current or transfer student, you’ll find the education and resources you need to Move Mountains at ACC and beyond.

by Jeff Duggan, ACC Communications Coordinator

Strengthening Student Success

As the semesters and years move forward, it appears that student needs increase. More and more often, instructors are addressing learning issues beyond direct course content. I would like to take one teaching strategy, and use that as an example of how to better work with today’s student.

A promising teaching strategy connects to the benefits of reading fiction. The following was taken from Educational Technology and Mobile Learning, April 7, 2014: Recent neuro-scientific research posted in the New York Times reveals that reading stories with detailed descriptions and complicated plots written in an evocative and emotional language full of metaphors and other figures of speech does stimulate the brain and even change how we react in life. Researchers from Emory University discovered, through a series of brain scans done on a number of subjects that brains respond differently to metaphors. For instance, when subjects read a metaphor that involved texture, the sensory cortex (that part of the brain responsible for perceiving texture through touch) became active. In two other studies published in 2006 and 2009, Drs. Oatley and Mar found that “individuals who frequently read fiction seem to be better able to understand other people, empathize with them, and see the world from their perspective.”

I am a Learning Disabilities Specialist. The research cited above was posted by Lindamood-Bell in December 2014; Lindamood-Bell is an agency that works with children and adults with learning disabilities (LD). Whether you have a student with a learning disability, any disability, or no disability, this teaching strategy of using metaphors and other figures of speech is beneficial for all.

Regardless of the content you teach, this instructional technique can be used in most courses. Stronger students become more successful students, which creates an improvement in classroom climate! And for those working within ACC but not in the classroom, metaphorical language can be added into a conversation with a student. Just watch their thinking enlarge.

Interested in knowing more about learning issues? Please view this brief LD Podcast that is housed on ACC’s website.

Maureen Rafferty
Student Access Services Specialist