ACC Student Spotlight – Jason Tempest

John Tempest, ACC studentJason is getting an associate of arts in psychology and plans to transfer and continue down the psychology path. His primary coursework was taken at the ACC Parker campus. He appreciated the friendly staff at ACC and particularly the Parker Campus helped him in a variety of ways. When the day to day problems arose, the ACC staff was always willing to pitch in and help solve those everyday issues – they are so helpful. Jason is also thankful for the Financial Aid Office and Academic Advising department to keep him on track towards his degree and future goals.

Besides the staff, Jason also thinks very highly of the faculty at ACC. “The wonderful teachers have given me much insight into organization, writing, editing, and psychology basics.” The goals of the ACC learning outcomes are to prepare learners for life success. These outcomes address the knowledge, skills, and values that are fundamental to the personal and professional growth of students, employees, and community. Jason has experienced these outcomes firsthand.

To end with some final thoughts from Jason, “I believe the connections I have made here will no doubt go beyond my academic stay here at ACC.” Move Mountains, Jason!

by Karen Browning, Marketing Project Manager

Arapahoe Community College will host Start Now! enrollment expo on July 22

Start Now Orientation 2017Arapahoe Community College will offer an opportunity for anyone to begin the process of enrolling in Fall 2017 classes with its Start Now! orientation and registration event on Saturday, July 22, from 8:00 a.m. – 1:00 p.m. at the Littleton and Parker campuses.

Start Now! will provide all students who have applied to ACC – but are not yet registered – with the opportunity to complete new student orientation and free English/math assessment testing while receiving assistance with career/academic advising, financial aid and registration during this one-day session. Refreshments will be available.

The event will include tours of the College, and staff will be on hand to help answer any questions you may have about ACC’s programs, beginning your college career, and paying for college. Please bring your 2015 tax forms if you are interested in free assistance with completing the FAFSA.

Nursing simulation activityAttendees at the Parker campus – where students can now complete their Associate of Arts / Associate of Science degrees in their entirety – can tour the newly-remodeled science labs and classrooms designed to maximize experiential and collaborative learning. Parker-area students can now study natural sciences, math, health, and computer science closer to home.

At ACC, we offer both quality and value. ACC has nearly 100 associate degree and certificate programs, and credits are guaranteed to transfer into Colorado’s four-year public institutions. Our instructors are experts in their field, and classes are available both online and at our campuses in Littleton, Parker and Castle Rock.

RSVP now for Start Now! at Littleton or Parker. Don’t forget to have test scores and/or high school transcripts ready when you RSVP. For more information about Start Now!, or to apply for admission to ACC, please contact Student Recruitment and Outreach at acc.info@arapahoe.edu or 303.797.5637.

A Day of Service at Audubon’s Nature Center

It was a hot day. Yes, it was sunny and clear and dry, so it was a “nice” day to do some gardening outdoors with the Audubon Society of Greater Denver near Chatfield State Park here in Littleton. But it was hot.

The Service Learning Center, along with ACC’s ViTaL (Volunteering To Learn) Team, helped get faculty involved with this year’s “Day of Service” on Saturday, April 14, 2017, sponsored by Student Life. We ended up with seven able-bodied volunteers around 1 p.m. to help dig out mint, grasses, and rabbit brush from a bird garden area at the entrance to Audubon’s Nature Center very near the parking lot, and very near the unrelenting construction taking place at the main road. But the noisy trucks did not deter us from helping beautify this community area for Audubon, whose motto is “Connecting people with nature through conservation, education, and research.”

 

Steven and Ashley -student volunteers

Steven and Ashley (our two student volunteers) dug right in (pun intended!) to help Audubon for 3 hours on Saturday in the heat and sun, with plenty of birds chirping in the background.

Rebecca from Veterans Services removes invasive grasses along the perimeter of the bird garden.

Whitney from Student Life helps Ashley in the bird garden with bird-catching nets in the background. The nets are used during bird banding days in April and March each year, teaching the public about some of Colorado’s feathered friends.

Register for a bird banding event here.

Rebecca from Veterans Services removes invasive grasses along the perimeter of the bird garden.

Rebecca from Veterans Services removes invasive grasses along the perimeter of the bird garden.

Our ACC student teaches Sarah (also from Student Life) and Whitney, along with Rebecca, how to dig a proper hole.

Our ACC student teaches Sarah (also from Student Life) and Whitney, along with Rebecca, how to dig a proper hole.

Jennifer

Jennifer (a teacher in our Psychology Department) battled (and won!) her fight to clip off and dig out rabbit brush roots in this dry, yet quite rocky, soil.

birds in tree

And…we actually saw a few birds at Audubon. These two Red-winged Blackbirds coached all of us volunteers that day from the newly blooming trees above.

The Service Learning Center, Student Life, and the ViTaL Team look forward to future volunteering events at Audubon! Learn more about Audubon in our area.

by Diana Hornick, Service Learning Center Coordinator

Abraham: An ACC “Success Tori”

Tori AbrahamThere was a time when Arapahoe Community College student Tori Abraham wasn’t certain about how to move forward with her academic and career aspirations.

Now, not only is she on target to graduate from ACC this May (Associate of Arts in Psychology), she’s already moving mountains in the lives of youngsters throughout the south metro Denver area.

The Mountain Vista High School graduate, who began attending ACC in August of 2014, currently works as a Registered Behavioral Technician (RBT) at Trumpet Behavioral Health in Centennial, and also as a nanny for two different families.

“Not all children are fortunate enough to have a strong support system,” stated Abraham.  “I feel like it’s more beneficial to build strong youth rather than to mend adults. I love brightening the lives of children and seeing them smile. It’s very fulfilling to watch their lives improve and see them grow.”

Abraham has taken three courses with ACC Psychology Faculty Allison Hagood, looking forward to each and every class session. She credits Hagood with advancing her interest and passion for psychology, alluding to how the Abnormal Psychology course in particular has been instrumental in giving her perspective about obstacles that others – as well as she herself – may encounter.

“Tori is a delight to have in class,” said Hagood. “She’s thoughtful and engaged, both with her professors and with other students. I am looking forward to the great things she’s going to accomplish in the future.”

Abraham praised her younger sister, Ellie, for being influential in her success at ACC. “She, unlike myself, has always been passionate about school,” Abraham said about Ellie, who will be attending CU Denver next fall. “Ellie has been such an inspiration for me ever since I first enrolled at ACC nearly three years ago. I’ve grown into a student who loves to learn. I’ve had great professors and I’m passionate about Psychology. I’ve been able to succeed at ACC like I never dreamed possible.”

Abraham is a recipient of both the Thom Sorensen Psychology Scholarship and the All-American Scholarship, and was inducted into ACC’s Sigma Phi Chapter of Phi Theta Kappa International Honor Society in the fall of 2015. Earlier this spring, Abraham was named to the PTK All-Colorado Academic Team.

“I’m very proud to have been part of PTK,” said Abraham. “It’s been exciting to be a part of something so prestigious, and it has opened so many doors for me.”

Abraham will transfer to CU Boulder next fall to pursue her bachelor’s degree in Psychology. She aspires to work in the field of clinical psychology with a specialization in youth counseling.

by Jeff Duggan, ACC Communications Coordinator

Celebrating Democracy

There is another big change in the US of A: a new President. ACC is celebrating democracy in America by getting together for Diversity Dialogues on Monday, January 23 at 1pm in M2720, Littleton campus. Whatever your feelings are about our new President, stop by and engage in a discussion. Diversity Dialogues are a great space designed to allow students, staff, and community members to come together to share their thoughts in a safe environment. If you can’t stop by today, Student Life hosts weekly Diversity Dialogues. Check the schedule for one that works for you.

This year in politics has been one to remember and will definitely go down in the history books. It has been controversial and has raised a lot of questions within our country. When things like this happen, young adults are hesitant to reveal their own views and state what they are truly thinking. We are often told that our votes don’t matter or our views and opinions don’t matter. But I think that is totally backwards.

As upper-education students, I believe that we all have the right to express our own feelings and opinions. In addition to having the right, it is our civic duty. We are the future of the United States (yes, I know that sounds cheesy and you’ve heard it a million times before, but it’s true!). We should all be able to express what we think on a subject, no matter what said subject is. It allows for great conversations and debates, which eventually leads to learning. And that learning leads to us being more sensitive and aware of the world around us.

That is what I like about ACC. It is an open space to share your opinions. Sure, it may cause some debates (some more heated than others), but, hey, that’s the fun part! I am lucky enough to be a journalism major in this very interesting time in America and last semester, my class talked extensively on the subject of politics. My class was divided when it came to talking about the election and it led to multiple passionate debates between class members. And let me tell you, I learned more from those debates than I did in my entire high school civics class. Politics is a fact of life, so you might as well embrace it with open arms and learn from it!

Whether you like President Trump or not, you are able to express your opinions on him. And that is truly what democracy is.

by Ashlyn Stetzel, ACC Journalism Major

In Phi Theta Kappa your potential is limitless

Tasha EsteinIf you catch a bee in glass, you’ll find the bee will hit the top of the glass a few times–trying to fly away–before stopping. If you take that same glass and flip it right side up (without removing the bee), you’ll find that the bee won’t try to fly away any more. In fact, it’s usually quite a while before the bee even realizes that he can fly to reach his full potential. We, as humans, create these same kinds of limitations for ourselves every day. We see how expansive the sky appears to be, but because we have fumbled along the way a few times and hit the glass– maybe because we were under-prepared, were told that we couldn’t do better, or it simply wasn’t the right time – we think of that small, limited glass as our best lot in life. I’m here to help you realize that the sky is the limit – there are no glass limitations except those that you set for yourself. Phi Theta Kappa can help actualize that.

For those of you that know me, hi! For those that do not, I’m Tasha Estein – Phi Theta Kappa, Sigma Phi chapter’s historian for this year. I have a secret to share with you all: I’m completely mediocre. I didn’t learn how to read until I was almost 10 years old. I had to retake my senior year of high school. And I had to wait seven years just to get into community college. I have fallen more times than I can count and I have fallen harder than I ever thought I could recover from.

When I started classes at ACC last fall, if you asked me then where I thought I would be in a year’s time–I would have had very low expectations for myself. I came to this school wanting to be invisible: to get my credits and go. I never expected to do anything that I would be proud of, and I certainly didn’t expect to be in a position where people would care who I was. In this last year, however, I have won several awards, been selected for noteworthy positions, and accomplished many things that anyone would be proud of. I will not bother you with the boring specifics, but to give you a bit of perspective: this time last week I was at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida working with NASA scientists and 40 exceptional community college students from all over the US. The real kick that I get out of those community college students? Almost all of them were Phi Theta Kappa members and some of them are even intending to run for an International Office for next year. This trend is not limited to NASA either.

Over the past year, I have attend many events, always with a large variety of students. But almost always I have found that the most exceptional people are involved with PTK. And while there are successful students outside of PTK, this organization is a culmination of the best and brightest. Why? Because if you are reading this, you have already proved to be a hardworking individual. If you are reading this, you know that PTK has something important to give to you: the ability to go farther than you ever thought you could go before–a means of becoming the person that you were meant to be.

Although we all have different backgrounds and come from different walks of life, we have joined here because deep down we want to strive for greatness. Perhaps, some of you have already realized it or perhaps some of you are where I was a year ago–when I thought I wouldn’t amount to anything. No matter where you are, it’s important to remember that you will get what you give. If you are willing to work like you did to get to this point the only way out is up. From working with PTK I have gained confidence, found life changing opportunities, made friends and memories, and had a blast while doing it.

I want to personally encourage you to learn more about Sigma Phi. You have reached the edge of the glass. From here, you only need to remember to fly. I can’t wait to see where we will go from here. Thank you.

by Tasha Estein, ACC Student

Western Welcome Week 2016

Western Welcome Week Volunteers 2015

Western Welcome Week Volunteers 2015

We are just a couple of weeks away from Western Welcome Week! Arapahoe Community College (ACC) has a special place for the event that the City of Littleton puts on. We are sponsors, breakfast hosts, parking lot quarters, parade-goers, and festival vendors – we even provide water for the horses!

The 2016 Western Welcome Week theme is “Salute to Educators”. Each year the Western Welcome Week committee selects an individual or individuals that exemplifies the theme, as the Grand Marshal. This year there is a trio of grand marshals that represent the past, present and future of the education profession. We are honored that an ACC graduate, Hannah Sturdivant, has been selected as one of three grand marshals, serving as the future grand marshal. Sturdivant earned her Associate of Arts degree in Early Childhood Education, as well as her Early Childhood Director Certificate, at ACC. She is currently employed at Belle’s and Beau’s at the Farm in Aurora, and works with children of all ages. Hannah aspires to become a curriculum coordinator for various early childhood classrooms.

Western Welcome Week parade volunteers - 2015

Western Welcome Week parade volunteers – 2015

We have several opportunities to volunteer. ACC will host the Family Pancake Breakfast on Sunday, August 14 from 7:30 am – 11:30 am. Come and dine on all-you-can-eat pancakes, sausages, and coffee, while catching-up with friends. The kids can play FREE “Games of Old” and round up for the “Bruce Wolf Stick Horse Stampede”. The cost is $5 per person and is hosted on the ACC Littleton campus. If you would like to help serve the community breakfast, contact Jeff Duggan 303.797.5709 jeff.duggan@arapahoe.edu.

If you can’t make it on the 14th, then consider volunteering on Saturday, August 20 at the Grand Parade. The parade runs from 10 am – noon though downtown Littleton. Join the ACC parade walkers as we represent the college and Salute to Educators. After the parade, you can visit the festival and all the great vendors from around the city. If you would like to walk the parade with the ACC team, contact Karen Browning 303.797.5736 karen.browning@arapahoe.edu.

The Western Welcome Week celebrations start Friday August 12th and go through Sunday August 21st. There are plenty of activities for you and the family. Or if you are just looking to attend the celebration, check out the list of events at westernwelcomeweek.org. We hope to see you there!

by Karen Browning

 

Transitioning to Civilian

Jason:

This is my first blog so be gentle please. But first a little about me. My name is Jason Moore. I joined the army in 2010 as a 13B or other words knows as Field Artillery Crewman. I was stationed at 101st Airborne Division after basic training and AIT (Advanced Initial Training). I was shortly deployed to Afghanistan in the Kunar province for a year.  I spent 3 years in the army and got out due to a medical reason. When I got out I thought I would just go back to my normal civilian life but it wasn’t easy.

I decided to try and start school to occupy my free time and thought again “this will be easy, I’ve been through the military training, I got this in the bag.”  I was wrong, though. This is a completely different world than I thought. If it wasn’t for the great resources the Veteran center had such as peer tutors, a private place to study (the lounge) and instructors like I had (Joe Slonka, and Richard Corbetta) and all the others in the paralegal program, I believe I will would have quit, but I’m glad I didn’t. But I’m not the only one. DJ will tell you his story now.

DJ:

My name is Daniel Cunningham, like Jason this is my first time writing in a blog format so please be understanding to the both of us. I joined the military back in 2005 as a 91w at the time, it is now known as a 68w or medic. My time in the military was very diverse. I went from Ft. Hood where I had my first deployment to Iraq with 4th ID. When I got back I was put with 1st ID 1/26 where I went on my second deployment in 2008 to Afghanistan. After that I did a stent in Korea and finally came back to 1/26 at Ft Knox, where I went on my final deployment which ended with me being medically retired from the military in 2014.

Coming out of the military was extremely hard on me. I did not want out and I had fought my medical board for almost two years before I finally resigned to my fate. When I first got out I lived with my family here in Colorado trying to figure out what I should do with my life now. My life goals of doing 20 years in the military and then going over to the police force were no longer possible, so I spiraled into a state of depression. Finally, my wife had had enough of me and forced me to go to school to find myself again. Since then I have been a lot happier and have finally chosen a career path for myself, geophysical engineering, which feels good. I believe that being around the fellow Veterans here at ACC and hearing their stories has helped me move through the transition and find a new life outside of the military.

ACC can be a great place for each of our Veterans coming back. We want each of you to find your place here at ACC – join us in the Veterans Lounge, stop by a Student Veterans Association meeting in the fall or use any of the great resources. While it will not always be easy to make a transition, by making connections here at ACC, you’ll have an overall better time here and hopefully a successful experience. You can contact us at jmoore249@student.cccs.edu and dcunningham23@student.cccs.edu

by Jason Moore and DJ Cunningham