Money, Elections, and Government

Washington DC skyline view with Lincoln Memorial, Washington

Washington DC skyline view with Lincoln Memorial, Washington Monument and US Capitol Building at night

Are you curious about how elections work in the US and how they impact our economy? For example, did you know that the real GDP (Gross Domestic Product) generally increases 24 months prior to an election and falls 21 months after?

We are excited to share an exciting opportunity with you for the Fall 2016 semester: a learning community between ECO 201, Principles of Macroeconomics and POS 111, American Government focused on the Presidential Elections.

While enrolled in these learning community-specific courses, you will learn about how the US government and the US economy works, specifically during and surrounding this election season. You will research and discuss public opinion and citizen participation, political parties, interest groups, the electoral process, and the structure and functions of the national government in POS 111, while you explore the interrelationships among household, business, and government sectors, saving and investment decisions, unemployment, inflation, national income accounting, taxing and spending policies, the limits of the market and government, public choice theory, the Federal Reserve System, money and banking, and international trade in ECO 201.

Wondering how those big campaign budgets impact the economy or why there is so much debate about the next Supreme Court Justice and who gets to appoint the justices? This learning community will allow you to really scrutinize how our government and our economy are interrelated.

Are you ready to delve into the realm of politics and elections? All you have to do to take these linked courses is enroll in ECO 201, section 301, CRN 24621 and POS 111, section 301, CRN 24690.

Some key points to consider include:

  • You must enroll in both classes at the same time.
  • Classes meet on Monday/Wednesday from 11:30 a.m. – 12:45 p.m.
  • Both classes are in a hybrid format, which means they share a class time slot.
  • Hybrid also means that half the course work is completed outside class…much of this is online.
  • You will receive separate grades for ECO 201 and POS 111 and are expected to do all of the coursework for both classes.

If you have any questions, please contact Mary Carr – Chair, Department of Anthropology, Economics, Political Science, and Sociology or Tami Bertelsen – Economics Department Lead.